Page 1 of 1

What is the "bitter cup" in Christianity?

Posted: Mon Apr 02, 2018 10:18 pm
by karl61
On another thread a reference was given to D&C section 19 and the atonement.

18 Which suffering caused myself, even God, the greatest of all, to tremble because of pain, and to bleed at every pore, and to suffer both body and spirit—and would that I might not drink the bitter cup, and shrink—

In 3 Nephi 11:11 it says:

11 And behold, I am the light and the life of the world; and I have drunk out of that bitter cup which the Father hath given me, and have glorified the Father in taking upon me the sins of the world, in the which I have suffered the will of the Father in all things from the beginning.

Now, for me, when I look at writings of Joseph Smith I believe his thoughts were created from reviewing centuries of religious writings.

If you google "bitter cup" Protestant theology you get a lot of different hits and explanations.

any thoughts?

Re: What is the "bitter cup" in Christianity?

Posted: Mon Apr 02, 2018 11:13 pm
by Dr. Shades
karl61 wrote:Now, for me, when I look at writings of Joseph Smith I believe his thoughts were created from reviewing centuries of religious writings. . . any thoughts?

Yes: "You're just now noticing this?"

Re: What is the "bitter cup" in Christianity?

Posted: Tue Apr 03, 2018 7:53 am
by karl61
Dr. Shades wrote:
karl61 wrote:Now, for me, when I look at writings of Joseph Smith I believe his thoughts were created from reviewing centuries of religious writings. . . any thoughts?

Yes: "You're just now noticing this?"


I think it's just appearing little by little, line upon line to me. I think he took a lot of terms like infinite atonement from Calvinist and Quakers and Anabaptist. Those terms may not be used in today's protestant sermons by were likely used by preachers in Europe and America. Alexander Campbell certainly made the case in his little pamphlet that the Book of Mormon contained all the hot issues discussed in church's in the upper New York state area.

But I still need a little clarification on the bitter cup, especially the D&C verse

"and would that I might not drink the bitter cup, and shrink"

It goes on to the next verse after the word shrink and why did he not want to drink it and why use the last word of shrink.

Re: What is the "bitter cup" in Christianity?

Posted: Wed Apr 04, 2018 10:58 am
by huckelberry
karl61 wrote:I think it's just appearing little by little, line upon line to me. I think he took a lot of terms like infinite atonement from Calvinist and Quakers and Anabaptist. Those terms may not be used in today's protestant sermons by were likely used by preachers in Europe and America. Alexander Campbell certainly made the case in his little pamphlet that the Book of Mormon contained all the hot issues discussed in church's in the upper New York state area.

But I still need a little clarification on the bitter cup, especially the D&C verse

"and would that I might not drink the bitter cup, and shrink"

It goes on to the next verse after the word shrink and why did he not want to drink it and why use the last word of shrink.

Karl61, are there reasons you are looking beyond the obvious meaning, bitter cup is his suffering and death nailed to a cross?

Re: What is the "bitter cup" in Christianity?

Posted: Wed Apr 04, 2018 3:19 pm
by karl61
huckelberry wrote:
karl61 wrote:I think it's just appearing little by little, line upon line to me. I think he took a lot of terms like infinite atonement from Calvinist and Quakers and Anabaptist. Those terms may not be used in today's protestant sermons by were likely used by preachers in Europe and America. Alexander Campbell certainly made the case in his little pamphlet that the Book of Mormon contained all the hot issues discussed in church's in the upper New York state area.

But I still need a little clarification on the bitter cup, especially the D&C verse

"and would that I might not drink the bitter cup, and shrink"

It goes on to the next verse after the word shrink and why did he not want to drink it and why use the last word of shrink.

Karl61, are there reasons you are looking beyond the obvious meaning, bitter cup is his suffering and death nailed to a cross?


Thank you huckelberry for providing the clarification. A lot of things fly over my head.

Re: What is the "bitter cup" in Christianity?

Posted: Sat Apr 07, 2018 10:27 am
by Nightlion
Could be that in the act of atonement by taking upon himself the sins of the world he 'shrinks' from being fully God which sacrifice is finished on the cross. Then taking back his life again he regains full status as God. Thus God itself is renewed pushing back natural entropy. Just off the cuff here reading this moment. More could be said about this.

Re: What is the "bitter cup" in Christianity?

Posted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 2:58 pm
by msnobody
I think the bitter cup is the cup of God’s wrath upon sin. Jesus experienced separation from God the Father by taking this cup.

I may not understand this correctly, but I’ll say this too. Once the bride price is paid, the father pours a cup of wine at the ceremony. The bridegroom offers the cup to the future bride and by offering the cup he is vowing to give his life for his bride. Will the bride reach out to take the cup offered? When she reaches out to take the cup offered and drinks, she indicates she is willing to give her life for the bridegroom. The bridegroom, then, goes back to his home to prepare a place for his bride, for whom he will return for his bride at a time determined by his father.

Just my thoughts about the “bitter” cup and parallels to the bridegroom and his bride, the church.

Re: What is the "bitter cup" in Christianity?

Posted: Fri May 22, 2020 5:51 pm
by msnobody
I’m reading the book, The Tabernacle by M. R. DeHaan. In the book, the author poses the question, “What is in this cup to make Him cry for deliverance? He who shrank not from the jeering mob, He who feared not those who who would slay Him, He who later went without murmuring to the Cross, to die without complaint, what was this awful thing which makes Him cringe now, and cry out to the Father?... It was sin. Yours and mine! The only thing Jesus was afraid of was sin, and so He asks the Father, “Let this cup pass from me.’”
This is a really good book.

Post not completed. A storm is a coming BRB Well, I guess it is completed as I lost that train of thought when a mighty rushing wind came and the temperature suddenly dropped. I’m posting from our back porch.