A professor weighs in on Buck

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kairos
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A professor weighs in on Buck

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Dr. X

" Joseph Smith used Buck when writing the Lectures on Faith (he cites Buck by name). There’s an excellent study : (Bowman, Matthew, and Samuel Brown. “Reverend Buck’s Theological Dictionary and the Struggle to Define American Evangelicalism, 1802–1851.” Journal of the Early Republic 29, no. 3 (Fall 2009): 441–473.). "

ok now get to work- i want your research paper to determine how Joseph Smith used Buck's dictionary on the Book of Mormon by next Christmas!

just postulatin,
k

kairos
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Re: A professor weighs in on Buck

Post by kairos »

Another option for your research mission "mr phelps" , should you choose to accept it , is to compare Clarke's commentary to Joseph Smith commentary on the Bible-the Joseph Smith portion was compiled in a book by kent jackson in 1994. no one has done part two. Dr Wayment at BYU has compared Clarke's entries to the JST of the Bible.
you can get a Ph.D. from BYU if you compare the jackson data with clarke and find no connection- if you find direct plagiarism you will be excommunicated, labelled an anti, win a Pulitzer prize or let me buy you dinner!


k

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Re: A professor weighs in on Buck

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kairos wrote:
Mon May 18, 2020 9:02 am
Dr. X

" Joseph Smith used Buck when writing the Lectures on Faith (he cites Buck by name). There’s an excellent study : (Bowman, Matthew, and Samuel Brown. “Reverend Buck’s Theological Dictionary and the Struggle to Define American Evangelicalism, 1802–1851.” Journal of the Early Republic 29, no. 3 (Fall 2009): 441–473.). "

ok now get to work- i want your research paper to determine how Joseph Smith used Buck's dictionary on the Book of Mormon by next Christmas!

just postulatin,
k
Buck was a very influential writer. Brown et al were not the first or last to recognize Buck's impact on Mormonism but lets back up a bit here. I was raised in a church that touted Joseph Smith as a prophet through whom God restored many lost and wonderful truths. Time and time again I heard how Joseph Smith had brought back ancient teachings and lost powers. This was all presented to my generation as if Joseph Smith received all this wonderful instruction directly from God. Now here, many decades later, I realize that almost without exception, anything that Joseph Smith "revealed" can be found in the cultural, religious and intellectual milieu surrounding him. Time and time again the ideas and concepts expressed in Joseph Smith's writings can be shown to be already known and talked about in his own time. In my opinion, the greatest evidence that Joseph Smith made up everything he wrote is the fact that it all represents what was common knowledge in his own time.

Now the apologist is going to respond that it was impossible for Joseph Smith to have read all that material which, of course is simply irrelevant and an argument from ignorance. No one actually knows what Joseph Smith knew or did not know. No one has to show that Joseph Smith read all this stuff, we merely have to show that it was available at his time, a process which is very easy. So what do we have on Bucks that shows it was readily available in Joseph Smith's time? A lot actually.

We can start with Rick Grunder has to say about Buck in his incredible resource Mormon Parallels found here:
http://www.rickgrunder.com/getmp2014.html.
Rick Grunder wrote:Enlarged and updated, Buck's dictionary was also a standard reference work, widely available and used as an essential tool for understanding difficult issues, terms or phrases of the Bible. The very first catechetical question posed in the
Mormon Lectures on Faith, "What is theology?" was answered with a definition from "{Buck's Theological Dictionary, page 582.}" (1835 Doctrine and Covenants, page 9; "Theology. Lecture First On the Doctrine of the Church of the Latter Day Saints. Of Faith. Section I.").
Joseph Smith cited this book in his famous article, "Try the Spirits," in the Times and Seasons issue for Friday, April 1, 1842 [3:11], p. 745. In addition, he quoted from it (without naming his source) in the issue for April 15:
Next we could consider what Steve Fleming had to say about Buck's influence in Fleming's Ph.D. dissertation.
Flemming in The Fulness of the Gospel: Christian Platonism and the Origins of Mormonism" wrote:The description of the three Nephites was similar to Charles Buck’s entry on how eighteenth-century mystic William Law described humanity’s state before the fall. Adam was made in the image of the Triune God, a living mirror of the divine nature, formed to …live on earth as the angels do in heaven. He was endowed with immortality, so that the elements of this outward world could not have any power of acting on his body.” Pg 295 Fleming. According to Fleming the Dunkers were German followers of Jane Lead. See Pg 299 Fleming. The entry on the Dunkers (which was clearly about the Ephrata Cloister) in Buck’s Theological Dictionary said they “believe that the dead have the Gospel preached to them by our Saviors, and that the souls of the just are employed to preach the Gospel to those who have had no revelation in this life. Fleming pg 333.
Recently a BYU scholar has weighed in on the influence of Buck on the Book of Mormon.
we also encountered numerous theological parallels {to the Book of Mormon} to Charles Buck’s Theological Dictionary (1802). The parallels to Buck are inherently different from those identified in Clarke. They are broadly theological and while them demonstrate conceptual parallels, they lack the exactness of the Clarke parallels
Bottom line is the genius of Joseph Smith is in his ability to take what was already known around him and make his followers think he was restoring/revealing something new.

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