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 Post subject: Lesson for Nipper
PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2018 9:57 am 
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https://www.yahoo.com/news/us-tourist-k ... 04724.html


Contact with several tribes on the Andaman islands, set deep in the Indian Ocean, is illegal in a bid to protect their indigenous way of life and shield them from diseases (AFP Photo/Desha-Kalyan CHOWDHURY)

Members of one of the world's last tribes untouched by modern civilisation have killed an American who ventured illegally onto their remote island, Indian police said Wednesday.

John Allen Chau, 27, was hit by a hail of arrows as he set foot on North Sentinel Island, part of the Indian Andaman Islands, last Saturday, official sources told AFP.

"He was attacked by arrows but he continued walking. The fishermen saw the tribals tying a rope around his neck and dragging his body," the source said.

"They were scared and fled but returned next morning to find his body on the seashore."

North Sentinel is home to the Sentinelese people, believed to number only around 150. To protect their way of life, foreigners and Indians are banned from going within three miles (five kilometres).

Chau had offered local fishermen money to take him to the island, the source said. They took him some of the way and he paddled the rest in a canoe.

Some Indian media suggested that Chau was a missionary seeking to convert the islanders to Christianity but a local policeman told the News Minute website this was inaccurate.

"He was on a misplaced adventure in (a) prohibited area to meet uncontacted persons," Dependra Pathak told the website.

Media reports also said the fishermen told a preacher in the main town of the Andamans, Port Blair, about the incident and the preacher contacted Chau's family in the United States.

A spokesperson for the US consulate in the southern Indian city of Chennai told AFP only that they were aware of "reports concerning a US citizen in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands".

- Hostile hunters -

The Andamans are also home to the 400-strong Jarawa tribe who activists say are threatened by contact from outsiders. Tourists have previously bribed local officials in a bid to spend time with them.

But the Sentinelese still shun all contact with the outside world and have a record of hostility to anyone who tries to get close.

In 2006, two Indian fishermen who moored their boat to sleep were killed when the vessel broke loose and drifted onto North Sentinel, according to Survival International, a group protecting tribal people's rights.

The Sentinelese hunt and gather in the forest, and fish in the coastal waters.

The island was hit by the devastating 2004 tsunami that swept across the Indian Ocean but not much is known about the impact it had on the reclusive inhabitants.

After the tsunami one member of the tribe was photographed attempting to fire an arrow at an Indian Coast Guard helicopter.

Indian authorities make periodic checks on the tribe from boats anchored at a safe distance from shore.

Survival International, based in London, said that the "tragedy" of the American's death "should never have been allowed to happen".

"The Indian authorities should have been enforcing the protection of the Sentinelese and their island for the safety of both the tribe and outsiders," it said.

"Instead, a few months ago the authorities lifted one of the restrictions that had been protecting the Sentinelese tribe's island from foreign tourists, which sent exactly the wrong message, and may have contributed to this terrible event."

- Arrests -

Since the Indian authorities keep away from the island, it was unclear whether Chau's killing will have legal repercussions.

Indian police said a murder case had been registered against "unknown" tribespeople and that six fishermen and one other person were arrested.

"The investigation in this matter is on," senior police officer Deepak Yadav said in a press release.

Police official Pathak said the authorities were consulting "anthropologists and tribal welfare experts" to work out how best to retrieve the victim's body.

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 Post subject: Re: Lesson for Nipper
PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2018 11:01 am 
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Eternity is always more important than the here and now. And it's a shame that no one attempted to help them when they were hit by the tsunami. That would have been a very good opportunity to show these tribesmen some love in action.


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 Post subject: Re: Lesson for Nipper
PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2018 11:06 am 
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Slain Ecuador Missionaries' Plane Found : Amazon: Discovery inspires a family crusade to recover the Piper, salvage as much of it as possible and piece it together as a memorial for the five men, who were killed in 1956.
October 30, 1994|NANCY A. DONNELLY | NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC


TONAMPARE, Ecuador — Five American missionaries flew into Ecuador's Amazon jungle 38 years ago in a yellow Piper. A week later they were all dead, speared by primitive Indians who believed they were cannibals.

The Huaorani Indians demolished the single-engine plane on a small landing strip on the Curaray River that the Protestant missionaries had code-named Palm Beach.

Days after the Jan. 8, 1956, killings, another missionary flying over the site saw no traces of the plane. Everyone assumed that violent tropical storms had washed it downriver.

But last June, amid the martyred missionaries' graves, two members of the clan who had done the killing stumbled on a piece of metal sticking out of the sand near Palm Beach. They uncovered the front lower fuselage of the Piper, which had been piloted by Nathanael Saint of Huntingdon Valley, Pa.

The discovery inspired a family crusade to recover the Piper, salvage as much of it as possible and piece it together as a memorial to honor the five dead men.

The Saints hope this tribute will encourage future missionaries and further understanding between two vastly disparate cultures. The number of American missionaries has declined worldwide in the past four decades. Some are still being martyred.

Saint's sister, Rachel, 80, has lived peacefully with the Huaorani since 1958, when she moved to Ecuador as a translator with the Summer Institute of Linguistics (Wycliffe Bible Translators). "Ironically, the Indians are very excited about the find," she said. "It's important to them, because the event marks an end to their killing."

After the initial find, Nate Saint's son Stephen, 43, of Ocala, Fla., took charge of the search for the rest of the wreckage.

"The strange thing was that I had just met a pilot in Russia who told me his dream was to find and salvage Dad's plane," he said. "So when I heard, I got right on a plane to Ecuador."

Joining in the search are Steve's son Jaime, 17, and his brother, Philip, along with several Huaorani and William Clapp, a pilot for Mission Aviation Fellowship in Shell, Ecuador. Nate Saint piloted the plane for the fellowship.

The team is steadily recovering half-buried, scattered parts. Each recovery stirs memories of a mission that began with hope and ended in horror.

Discovery of the plane's fragments, said Steve Saint, is "almost as if God is saying, 'I want you to remember what happened here.' "

All five victims were young. Nate Saint was 32; James Elliot of Portland, Ore., 28; Edward McCully of Milwaukee, 28; Peter Fleming of Seattle, 27, and Roger Youderian of Lansing, Mich., 31.

For several months before the landing at Palm Beach, the missionaries periodically flew from Shell over the Huaorani village in the Amazon rain forest, or Oriente.

To win the trust of the reclusive Indians, the men dropped gifts of machetes and aluminum kettles. In return, the Huaorani gave the Americans gifts, including a live parrot.

Most Huaorani are primitive, semi-nomadic hunters. They have fiercely guarded their territory for centuries, earning a reputation for savagery.

The Christians were fully aware of the danger, so they kept their mission a secret.

Their landing was uneventful. For four days, they saw no people. On the fifth day, three naked Huaorani, two women and a man, walked out of the jungle. Fist-size balsa wood ornaments hung in their distended earlobes.

Initially, the meeting was amicable. The missionaries cooked hamburgers for their visitors, shared insect repellent with them, even took them for rides over the dense green forest in the yellow Piper, which the Indians named the "wood bee."

The Americans showed the Huaorani a photograph of Dayuma, a woman from their tribe who had fled many years before, during a wave of intra-tribal killings.

The missionaries' friendly gestures didn't save their lives.

George, the Americans' nickname for the Huaorani man who had greeted them, told the tribe that the white men were cannibals who had attacked him.

This belief was reinforced by the photograph of Dayuma. George said the image proved that the missionaries had possession of her spirit.

Two days after the missionaries and the Huaorani met, six tribal warriors attacked Palm Beach. One by one, they slaughtered the missionaries with 9-foot spears. Although the missionaries were armed, they chose to fire their guns into the air instead of shooting the Indians.

In 1958, two Huaorani women told Rachel Saint and Elisabeth Elliot, James Elliot's widow, that the Indians had come to recognize that the killings were a mistake. For his lies, George was speared to death.

The Huaorani and American women returned with Dayuma to the tribe to finish the missionaries' work. Rachel Saint and Dayuma still live in the village of Tonampare, a muddy clearing ringed by tin-roofed shacks near Palm Beach.

Differing experts estimate the number of Huaorani today at 600 to 1,300. Most of them live on a reservation in Ecuador's Yasuni National Park and have abandoned their Stone Age ways


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 Post subject: Re: Lesson for Nipper
PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2018 12:55 pm 
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This false corrupter of innocents met the end that the Lord ordained. :cool:

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 Post subject: Re: Lesson for Nipper
PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2018 10:07 pm 
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Romans 3:12
12 all have turned away and at the same time become useless;
there is no one who does any good, not a single one!

Show me an innocent man and he would have to be Jesus.


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 Post subject: Re: Lesson for Nipper
PostPosted: Sat Nov 24, 2018 10:25 am 
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LittleNipper wrote:
That would have been a very good opportunity to show these tribesmen some love in action.

In this case, love is best shown at ten thousand arm lengths.

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 Post subject: Re: Lesson for Nipper
PostPosted: Sat Nov 24, 2018 10:51 am 
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LittleNipper wrote:
Romans 3:12
12 all have turned away and at the same time become useless;
there is no one who does any good, not a single one!

Show me an innocent man and he would have to be Jesus.


A letter from Paul who never met Jesus and made up everything he ever said about him. :lol: :lol: :lol:

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 Post subject: Re: Lesson for Nipper
PostPosted: Sat Nov 24, 2018 12:05 pm 
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I feel like Makustov has been very disrespectful toward Little Nipper and Christianity on this thread. Christians are good people just trying to bring the gospel of Jesus Christ to all the inhabitants on Earth. I feel sad when people rejoice in the death of Christian missionaries.

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 Post subject: Re: Lesson for Nipper
PostPosted: Sat Nov 24, 2018 12:10 pm 
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Doctor CamNC4Me wrote:
I feel like Makustov has been very disrespectful toward Little Nipper and Christianity on this thread. Christians are good people just trying to bring the gospel of Jesus Christ to all the inhabitants on Earth. I feel sad when people rejoice in the death of Christian missionaries.

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I would have been more disrespectful but it is Celestial. :lol: :lol: :lol:

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