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 Post subject: Strange Mormon Funerals
PostPosted: Sun Nov 06, 2016 8:36 am 
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I recently attended the funeral of a family member. An in law to be exact. Since I have been out of the church for a while much of the ceremony seemed obnoxious. Each of his children spoke. Some of them gave a history of their father and what he meant to them. It was rather touching and brought back all my memories of this individual. Then one proceeded to give a testimony of the church and how great it was. Sure he mentioned their father but that was not the point of this comments. It was all about the church and how it was going to save their father from death, and how great Joseph Smith was.

Although I understand that funerals are a time of mourning, when the life of the the person is celebrated with out mentioning the church constantly I found it much more comforting than trying to link this persons identity to Joseph Smith.

Beyond that I had forgotten how much Mormons love to utter meaningless prayers. A prayer at the viewing. A prayer to open the funeral, a prayer to close it. A prayer at the graveside, a prayer on the food after. Some prayers better than others, but essentially all containing comments of how great the special knowledge they have as Mormons is.

If I were an outsider to Mormonism I would find the much of the ceremony rather bizarre and maybe even offensive, yet most attending found it very normal.

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 Post subject: Re: Strange Mormon Funerals
PostPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2016 2:09 pm 
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First off, sorry about your loss and I think it's good you were there to feel love and as support for others. I have felt similarly - particularly after having a faith crisis and realizing that Mormonism is a cult. It was really weird because this guy spoke, who previous to my faith crisis I had really respected, but after my faith crisis, I saw so much bs. Yet, his bs was very comforting to those most affected by that death.

To be fair, I went to a funeral of a friend who accidentally killed himself after many of his friends let him get on his motorcycle when he was drunk. These friends were not what I would say "religious" - yet they pulled out their bible and had something to say as to proof that he was saved and all was well. It seemed a bit odd.

Death has a way of making our vulnerability and impermanence more real - and it scares most of us. So, we try to cling to comfort - which is usually in religion - some "authority" on the matter - whether it is authors of biblical canon or Joseph Smith.


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 Post subject: Re: Strange Mormon Funerals
PostPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2016 2:28 pm 
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I feel the same way, Amore. I went to the funeral of my LDS aunt this summer in very Mormon southern Alberta. While parts of the whole process would not have been comforting to me, I was struck by how her friends and immediate family did draw comfort. Death is a very tough thing for most folks, and don't see any reason to quibble with whatever folks chose to do to get through it.

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 Post subject: Re: Strange Mormon Funerals
PostPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2016 2:39 pm 
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Res Ipsa wrote:
I feel the same way, Amore. I went to the funeral of my LDS aunt this summer in very Mormon southern Alberta. While parts of the whole process would not have been comforting to me, I was struck by how her friends and immediate family did draw comfort. Death is a very tough thing for most folks, and don't see any reason to quibble with whatever folks chose to do to get through it.

Good point - kind of like your sig quote - "Our truths may not be true, but they are ours."


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 Post subject: Re: Strange Mormon Funerals
PostPosted: Wed Nov 09, 2016 2:08 pm 
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Amore wrote:
Res Ipsa wrote:
I feel the same way, Amore. I went to the funeral of my LDS aunt this summer in very Mormon southern Alberta. While parts of the whole process would not have been comforting to me, I was struck by how her friends and immediate family did draw comfort. Death is a very tough thing for most folks, and don't see any reason to quibble with whatever folks chose to do to get through it.

Good point - kind of like your sig quote - "Our truths may not be true, but they are ours."


Yeah, kind of like that. :smile:

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 Post subject: Re: Strange Mormon Funerals
PostPosted: Sun Nov 13, 2016 5:56 pm 
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Bike275 wrote:
I recently attended the funeral of a family member. An in law to be exact. Since I have been out of the church for a while much of the ceremony seemed obnoxious. Each of his children spoke. Some of them gave a history of their father and what he meant to them. It was rather touching and brought back all my memories of this individual. Then one proceeded to give a testimony of the church and how great it was. Sure he mentioned their father but that was not the point of this comments. It was all about the church and how it was going to save their father from death, and how great Joseph Smith was.

Although I understand that funerals are a time of mourning, when the life of the the person is celebrated with out mentioning the church constantly I found it much more comforting than trying to link this persons identity to Joseph Smith.

Beyond that I had forgotten how much Mormons love to utter meaningless prayers. A prayer at the viewing. A prayer to open the funeral, a prayer to close it. A prayer at the graveside, a prayer on the food after. Some prayers better than others, but essentially all containing comments of how great the special knowledge they have as Mormons is.

If I were an outsider to Mormonism I would find the much of the ceremony rather bizarre and maybe even offensive, yet most attending found it very normal.



My condolences. I attended my first Mormon funeral, back in January. The father of the man I was slated to marry. You described his funeral verbatim, with the exception of the older son, going on about himself, and the older daughter doing the same. A lot of posturing.

It was interesting, though, to see him laid out in his garments. My son kept trying to hide under the casket platform during the wake. The family put together a very touching service, and even I cried. I wish my family loved me that much. But yeah, I saw a lot of...how do I put it....sermonizing.

But then again, I saw that at my father's funeral, some 14 years ago. And my Evangelical American paternal family, even went so far as to say he was in hell.

Because my kind father, who never laid a hand on a soul....didn't go to church. Didn't become a preacher, like his mother and grandmother wanted him to.

I think that was the beginning of the end, for me.

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 Post subject: Re: Strange Mormon Funerals
PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2017 6:41 am 
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Sam Harris wrote:
Bike275 wrote:
I recently attended the funeral of a family member. An in law to be exact. Since I have been out of the church for a while much of the ceremony seemed obnoxious. Each of his children spoke. Some of them gave a history of their father and what he meant to them. It was rather touching and brought back all my memories of this individual. Then one proceeded to give a testimony of the church and how great it was. Sure he mentioned their father but that was not the point of this comments. It was all about the church and how it was going to save their father from death, and how great Joseph Smith was.

Although I understand that funerals are a time of mourning, when the life of the the person is celebrated with out mentioning the church constantly I found it much more comforting than trying to link this persons identity to Joseph Smith.

Beyond that I had forgotten how much Mormons love to utter meaningless prayers. A prayer at the viewing. A prayer to open the funeral, a prayer to close it. A prayer at the graveside, a prayer on the food after. Some prayers better than others, but essentially all containing comments of how great the special knowledge they have as Mormons is.

If I were an outsider to Mormonism I would find the much of the ceremony rather bizarre and maybe even offensive, yet most attending found it very normal.



My condolences. I attended my first Mormon funeral, back in January. The father of the man I was slated to marry. You described his funeral verbatim, with the exception of the older son, going on about himself, and the older daughter doing the same. A lot of posturing.

It was interesting, though, to see him laid out in his garments. My son kept trying to hide under the casket platform during the wake. The family put together a very touching service, and even I cried. I wish my family loved me that much. But yeah, I saw a lot of...how do I put it....sermonizing.

But then again, I saw that at my father's funeral, some 14 years ago. And my Evangelical American paternal family, even went so far as to say he was in hell.

Because my kind father, who never laid a hand on a soul....didn't go to church. Didn't become a preacher, like his mother and grandmother wanted him to.

I think that was the beginning of the end, for me.


The only reason a person would go to Hell is if they rejected Christ.


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